Racist violence against Chinese immigrants during the Mexican Revolution has been noted by many historians but satisfactorily explained by none. As Jason Oliver Chang notes in Chino, historians have until now tended to be satisfied with explaining anti-Chinese violence as an expression of xenophobic nationalism and then moving on to deal with matters of greater import. In Chino, Chang has written a book that puts anti-Chinese racism at the center of Mexican history. Readers who expect this book to merely recount and chronicle anti-Chinese racism will be surprised at the author's ambition. Certainly, Chang does an excellent job chronicling the forms that anti-Chinese racism took over the 60-year period covered in this book. A particular strength is the discussion of the development of antichinismo as a political trend within the nationalist mix of postrevolutionary Mexico. However, Chang's goal is not to chronicle the career of anti-Chinese racism but...

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