Sociologist Robert S. Jansen tackles the genesis of political change and creative social action through a detailed case study of Peru's first experience of populist mobilization in the early 1930s, long neglected by scholars in favor of Brazil and Argentina. By focusing on Peru and the role of Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre and Luis Miguel Sánchez Cerro in fostering lasting changes in Peru's political practices and in the Latin American style of populist mobilization, Jansen makes a welcome, though limited, contribution to the history of populism in the region. In the field of sociology, Revolutionizing Repertoires corrects structural approaches to populism by insisting on political actors' role in advancing political innovation. For historians of Latin America, the book usefully reminds them to return to the past and to places like Peru to better appreciate the differential origins and development of...

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