In the acknowledgments of Are We Not Foreigners Here?, author Jeffrey Schulze mentions that it was written over a span of many years—and when reading it, it is easy to see why that was the case. The scope of this work is ambitious, synthesizing primary and secondary sources on many topics and bringing together a wide variety of literatures that—while perhaps they should be—are not often read together. For example, the first two chapters examine governmental Indian policy in both Mexico and the United States over the span of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. While US policy may be familiar to many readers, Mexican policy is less frequently studied by historians and offers a useful counterpoint. Comparison leads to some interesting explorations since, as the author states, “the question remains why parallel ‘problems’ within both nation-states failed to produce parallel...

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