The aim of this collection, which brings together historical, scientific, and anthropological methodologies, is clear and straightforward: to problematize scholarship on Mexico's indigenous peoples that equates “the indigenous” with “the other.” Alterity is simply another way of saying “the other,” and as the editors of the volume suggest, “to be indigenous means to be other, to be the other” (p. 5). The book, divided in two parts, titled “Land and Government” and “Science,” respectively, confronts the issue of alterity from a multidisciplinary set of approaches. While not claiming to define or clarify who or what constitutes an indigenous identity, the authors instead attempt to redefine elements that have been viewed as indigenous in the past, such as communal land tenure, aversion to government education and development programs, and isolation from Spanish and Mexican politics and society as relics of a distant, long-lost...

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