The Latin American historiography on crime and policing, as well as incarceration, has grown considerably in the last two decades. Studies have focused on national histories and the emergence of professional police units and criminology schools in capital cities, as well as the general application of biological and positivist approaches to social control in urban and rural communities. Ricardo D. Salvatore has been a pioneer in the field and a coeditor for two earlier volumes on the subjects of crime and incarceration published in 1996 and 2001, and he provides an enthusiastic foreword to this volume written by a “younger generation of scholars” (p. vii). As a whole, the authors in Voices of Crime strive to add nuance and complexity to the history of crime and its reception in modern Latin America. The book contains eight chapters that are divided into two...

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