In Intimations of Modernity, Louis A. Pérez Jr. has returned to the formation of Cuban identity during the nineteenth century. Over the last several years Pérez has written on many different facets that shaped Cuban consciousness, including US influence and hurricanes, as well as on how a growing sense of their own history molded Cubans' political culture. These recent works have addressed how Cubans differentiated themselves from Spaniards, which led to the colonial rupture of the late nineteenth century. In this impressively researched volume, Pérez turns to the emergence of a culture of consumption of both goods and activities that gave rise to and helped define a growing middle class.

The first two chapters frame the changing economy within the context of the explosive expansion of the sugar plantation complex. This produced tremendous wealth but also depended on improving technologies and...

You do not currently have access to this content.