This study followed a rare and commendable trajectory. The original doctoral dissertation was conceived as a state-centered, top-down political study of nationalism in Spain during the turn of the nineteenth century. Eastman's early explorations, however, undermined the claim, by Eric Hobsbawm and others, that one should study nationalism from the perspective of the institutions that supposedly created it: governments. Primary documents suggested a broader cultural process that transcended the desiderata of rulers. Surprisingly, much of the discussion of the supposedly secular issue of national identity surfaced in ecclesiastical sources.

Eastman's response was both methodological and conceptual. He extended his research base in various directions. A collection of documents on friars, in Madrid's military archive of all places, revealed ecclesiastics' role as intermediaries between the crown and its subjects. He expanded the scope beyond Madrid. Case studies of Seville and Valencia added an...

You do not currently have access to this content.