In this critical and compelling reexamination of Tierra Amarilla land grant history, David Correia builds a deeper understanding of the process, widely researched today, of the loss of communal lands in New Mexico during the territorial period (1848–1912) and the twentieth-century repossession struggles launched by land grant heirs. Turning the focus away from the most often studied contradictions between the supposedly incompatible Anglo and Spanish-Mexican land tenure systems and property laws, as well as from the maneuvers of the corrupt lawyers, speculators, and government officials who manipulated them to their advantage, Correia brings to the fore issues and actors that have been neglected in most scholarly works on the subject. The result is a well-grounded history of the social production of property claims, and the continual struggle over them in the context of colonial expansionism—both Spanish and Anglo-American—from the late eighteenth century...

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