This is an important political and economic history of the late 1950s in Brazil, from the last years of Getúlio Vargas's presidency (and tragic death) through the administration of President Juscelino Kubitschek (1956–61). It relies on significant archival research in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo as well as analysis of government and industry publications. Rafael Ioris traces conflicts over development policy during these years that, he argues, laid the groundwork for political fractures that culminated in the military coup of 1964. Central debates regarding development policy included the degree to which industrialization should be prioritized over agricultural sectors, the importance (and desirability) of attracting greater foreign investment, and the appropriate role of the federal government—versus the private, corporate sector—in spurring economic growth. The book's final chapters discuss the impact of spiraling inflation on working people and the organized response of unions...

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