In a valuable contribution to scholarship on Nicaragua's east coast and the “official multiculturalism” now prevalent throughout Latin America, Jennifer Goett interrogates the meaning of autonomy for the Afro-descendant Creole residents of the community of Monkey Point. Revolution and counterrevolution brought to the east coast strong constitutional protections for community autonomy, but residents there remain subject to overlapping forms of intimate and state-sponsored violence that weigh especially heavily on the lives of Creole women. In the tradition of scholars such as Charles Hale and Edmund Gordon, Goett's engaged ethnography interrogates the forms of accommodation and resistance that people in Monkey Point use to negotiate citizenship and belonging. Goett also examines the limitations of official multiculturalism based on recognition of cultural difference while finding local understandings of self-determination “far more expansive and robust than highly compromised autonomy regimes might indicate” (pp. 5–6).

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