Interest in the architecture of Latin America is experiencing a major revival, with new scholarship and museum exhibitions receiving critical and popular acclaim. A particularly welcome addition is Luis Carranza and Fernando Lara's Modern Architecture in Latin America: Art, Technology, and Utopia. This generously illustrated volume offers readers a sharp analysis of the region's greatest (and most controversial) experiments with modern architecture.

The core of the book spans a period of 100 years, from 1903 to 2003. More traditional scholars maintain that the 1920s marked the arrival of modern architecture in Latin America. For Carranza and Lara, however, modern architecture is a broad category that includes not only art deco, late century eclecticism, and other styles but also painting, sculpture, city planning, landscape design, and an array of technical, historical, and ideological concerns that extend beyond the previously proposed periodization. To...

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