The present study is a revised version of the author's bachelor thesis that focuses on the kingdom of Quito's response to the global political crisis generated by the imprisonment of Ferdinand VII in 1808. By analyzing the evolution of two concepts, pueblo (people) and sovereignty, the author seeks to demonstrate that the political language of the time used by both insurgents and royalists had its intellectual foundation in Hispanic neo-scholasticism instead of the Enlightenment, as has been assumed. After a short first chapter in which the author introduces the global context for the monarchical crisis that took place in Spain after 1808, the second chapter analyzes the intellectual debate that took place in the kingdom of Quito in the early 1800s. The third and fourth chapters center on the language utilized in the moment of the Junta Suprema (1809–10) and of the...

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