In the late 1890s, Spanish authorities in Cuba relocated over half a million civilians, placing them in the first modern concentration camps. This model of control through concentration would be copied by British and American authorities in their colonial holdings before becoming infamous as a central feature of Nazi Germany's anti-Semitic policies. Daniel Nemser's Infrastructures of Race argues that the spatial concentration of colonial subjects did not have its origin in the nineteenth century but rather in the sixteenth century. From its inception, Spanish colonialism enacted policies of concentration on its indigenous subjects to further its aims of material exploitation and religious conversion. Using the lens of concentration with a robust theoretical paradigm rooted in Michel Foucault's notion of biopolitics, Nemser traces how several colonial projects used concentration to forge “infrastructures of race” that defined Spain's indigenous subjects.

Nemser's work traces the...

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