The growing body of literature about populism tends to approach the concept as an ideology, discourse, movement, political logic, or communicative style. Latin America has experienced different waves and types of populist leaders from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century who, despite their differences, share a significant feature: their charismatic messianic style. The figure of the populist redeemer is one of the key topics analyzed by Rafael Sánchez in Dancing Jacobins.

Very few, if any, works develop a genealogy of populism in Latin America, especially from the perspective of monuments and their meaning, a topic mainly addressed by sociocultural studies seeking to make sense of phenomena that interconnect memory, power, and change. In this book Sánchez provocatively traces the role played by monuments in the rise of populism. Moreover, by linking monuments with the imaginary of the “dancing Jacobins,” Sánchez offers...

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