In this history of early US imperial banking, Peter James Hudson argues that finance capitalism and racial capitalism arose together through the actions of bankers seeking to compete on the international banking scene. Hudson traces the establishment of US banks through the Caribbean and beyond from the late 1800s and shows how bankers influenced government policy to increase their advantages. In this expansion, as they fought regulations from Washington, banks such as the National City Bank of New York, International Banking Corporation, and (later) Chase Bank “participated in the creation, replication, and reordering of Caribbean economies on racial lines while helping to reproduce the racist imaginaries and cultures in which finance capital was embedded and through which bankers functioned” (p. 7). Hudson's monograph draws its analysis from an impressive and at times multinational array of sources, including the private papers of some...

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