This fine and creative book by Dalia Antonia Muller examines what scholars of nineteenth-century Cuban exile communities have known but have not yet seriously engaged: that Cuban émigrés resided not only in the United States but across the circum-Caribbean and South America. Muller notes that most studies have focused on New York and Florida and argues that broadening the gaze beyond the United States provides a conceptual path for reconsidering aspects of Gulf, Cuban, and Mexican history. The Gulf world, the author says, “shaped, and was intimately shaped by, the Cuban independence conflict during the nineteenth century” (p. 2).

Cubans in Mexico and other Gulf communities were part of an integrated transnational world of exiles who routinely migrated among various communities looking for work. Revolutionary newspapers circulating freely outside Cuba kept these exiles in touch ideologically. Exiles in Mexico played a very...

You do not currently have access to this content.