This is one of several volumes published recently concerning the Spanish Constitution of Cádiz, written following the Napoleonic invasion of the Iberian Peninsula and occupation of Portugal and Spain. Edited by Scott Eastman and Natalia Sobrevilla Perea, it contains 11 essays by different authors, an introduction by Eastman, and a brief epilogue by Eastman and Sobrevilla Perea. The collection reflects an international conference held in 2012 in Lima as well as a number of other conferences.

Among the most substantial essays is the one by Brian Hamnett, which helps to clarify that the two most striking departures of the Constitution of 1812 compared to Spain's earlier medieval fundamental laws were its incorporation of representation based on population and its separation of powers. Roberto Breña emphasizes that popular participation in the movement for liberal constitutionalism in Mexico was unique in Spanish America, as...

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