Pan American Women is a study in interwar feminist transnationalism, shaped by a climate of revolution in Mexico and accelerating female pacifist internationalism emerging from the United States. At the same time it is a study in asymmetrical ideals. One section of Diego Rivera's Pan-American unity mural The Marriage of the Artistic Expression of the North and of the South on This Continent serves as a cover to the book, putting into stark relief the cultural contrast between the two nations and, through artistry, the potential for bridges to link them. In her epilogue, the author describes the mural, commissioned in 1940 for the Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco, as Rivera's effort to exemplify a “meeting of equals” (p. 200). The mural is apposite to the leitmotifs of the book, which underscore Mexico's political divergence from the United States in...

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