As Brazil's right-wing military dictatorship tightened the screws in the late 1960s, popular musicians, visual artists, and authors on the left produced an outpouring of vital work. This cultural production challenged and provoked the military government but also offered penetrating criticism of flaws and failures within the Left, or the multiple Lefts. Scholars have analyzed this rich, complex cultural production created under the shadow of dictatorship for many years. What happened next has received far less scholarly attention. How did the remarkable cultural outpouring of the late 1960s evolve in the 1970s and beyond? What did it reveal about the changing dictatorship, the changing marketplace, and strategies and possibilities on the left and beyond? Chris Dunn explores these questions in this remarkable book, an outstanding work of cultural history and criticism.

Dunn argues that the cultural outpouring of the late 1960s marked...

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