Urban designer and architect Felipe Correa offers a provocative analysis of historical processes rarely examined through a single lens: resource extractivism and city building. The author begins by considering the vision of infrastructural integration known as the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America, which is shifting the region's historical North-South axis of extraction to an East-West orientation. Tied to capital's imperative to move raw materials out toward the Atlantic or Pacific, this shift in axis promises new “design and management challenges for . . . architecture and urban planning” (p. 2). To better inform those who meet these challenges, the book offers lessons from five case studies in Brazil, Venezuela, and Chile, where mining, oil, and hydroelectric power shaped regional urban formations. The cases highlight sites where experimental urban projects emerged amid extreme resource extraction. Methodologically structured around...

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