This excellent study of gender, indigeneity, and empire in the southwest borderlands of the early twentieth century has resulted from a collaboration between two scholars trained in different subfields: Progressive Era public health and transnational smuggling. Like the borderlands, collaborative scholarship (particularly within the humanities) can result in a muddled effort with dissonant voices. At the Border of Empires, in contrast, largely succeeds in precisely identifying the power of the local to shape the national and beyond. Indeed, Andrae Marak and Laura Tuennerman argue that “it was at the edges of empire that local forces . . . had the most chance to impact the implementation of national policies” (p. 2). Utilizing a most effective analytical tool—gender—this study aims to unveil what actually happened, not “what the leaders and policymakers wanted to happen” (p. 2).

In six short but substantive chapters...

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