Ori Preuss's book is a cultural history of international relations focused on the connections, shared spaces, and flows of Brazilian and Argentine intellectuals from the mid-nineteenth century to the beginnings of the twentieth. Preuss studies the complex dynamic of competitiveness and cooperation between these countries' elites through “diverse transnational activities such as translation, travel, public visits and conferences, the print press, cultural diplomacy, and intertextuality” (p. 7).

Transnational South America emerged from Preuss's previous work Bridging the Island: Brazilians' Views of Spanish America and Themselves, 1865–1912, which claimed that Brazilians' constructions of national self-identity and of Spanish America were interwoven (p. 156). In his recent book, however, Preuss attempts to go beyond analyzing the construction of the self against the Other in order to argue that national and regional elite identities form through what he denominates “transnational practices.” Preuss traces how...

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