The premise of this book, that publics in industrialized nations have overlooked Cuban medical internationalism, is indisputable. To correct this, John Kirk details the proactive Cuban presence in the aftermath of environmental catastrophes in developing nations, the country's vast medical pedagogical reach, and its robust partnerships in specific projects, such as biotechnology and eye surgery provision. Kirk objects to the labeling of Cuba's medical internationalism as a form of diplomacy, which, according to him, implies a strategic will to promote a political agenda. Instead, since its first mission following the Valdivia earthquake in Chile in 1960 and until its recent one during the West African Ebola crisis in 2014, Cuba has pursued a different approach to providing help that emphasizes quick responses, service to the neediest populations, and cooperation with local political patrons. Moreover, medical outreach by Cuba has assisted governments with...

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