At the onset of the Great Depression, native-born white Americans made Mexican emigrants the scapegoats for their joblessness and other economic ills. Across the country, individuals, political leaders, and local organizations began campaigns to deport Mexican immigrants. These repatriation drives kick-started a decade-long trend in which the number of Mexicans immigrating to the United States was eclipsed by the number returning to Mexico.

US historians—including Francisco E. Balderrama, Raymond Rodríguez, Camille Guerin-Gonzales, and others—have done much to expose and describe the long-forgotten history of the repatriation campaigns, using US archival sources and oral and written histories from the repatriates themselves to examine how such a thing could happen in the United States. Far less has been written about the ways that these repatriations affected Mexico and were perceived by the Mexican public. Fernando Saúl Alanís Enciso, a Mexican historian who has written...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.