Anyone who has strolled the lush curves of Mexico City's Condesa neighborhood might subconsciously have internalized the way that its striking art deco architecture echoed the stylized figures of contemporary female performers: both featured spare, machinelike, elongated forms that came to mark the city's landscape and visual culture by the 1930s. In this evocative book, Ageeth Sluis draws together the seemingly distinct revolutionary discourses about urban development and architecture, gender and sexuality, and race and nationalism, demonstrating fluidity in their respective disciplinary traditions. The principal argument is both nuanced and complex: that “building a utopian, revolutionary city was an aesthetic project that looked to female bodies for its inspiration, but it was also a moralistic project that attempted to contain women's mobility” (p. 296).

Sluis argues that from the final third of the Porfiriato through the period of revolutionary reform and state...

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