This short book is the first to tackle directly the topic of childhood under slavery in Jamaica, or for that matter anywhere in the Caribbean. Colleen Vasconcellos's emphasis is on change over time. She devotes one of her four chapters to the transitional apprenticeship period (1834–1838) and argues throughout the rest of the book that the conditions of the late period of slavery in the British-colonized Caribbean, once the Atlantic slave trade was under threat and then abolished, led to particularly focused attention on children by planters and managers. Vasconcellos aims to tell the “story of an overlooked childhood” and to “reveal . . . childhood from the inside,” a challenging task given the limited nature of the sources (p. 13). Those sources include published accounts by planters and travel writers, the correspondence and financial records of planters, legislation, baptismal records, slave...

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