More than 36 years after Peru's Maoist Shining Path insurgency carried out its first organized act of violence, it is still puzzling—and on a human level, deeply disturbing—that such a ruthless guerrilla movement could have gained sufficient support to control 40 percent of Peru's national territory in an internal conflict that took the lives of 70,000 people between 1980 and 2000. Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru: An Andean Town, 1870s–1970s addresses Shining Path's rise, focusing on Tarma province in Junín, which would become one of the most war-torn regions during the violence. Fiona Wilson draws on data from contemporaneous newspaper articles, official correspondence, and local interpretations of folklore, and from her interviews in Tarma in the 1970s and 1990s. She demonstrates how disillusionment within Tarma—especially among its progressive urban sectors—over the lack of political representation in the 100 years prior to...

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