For a long time, gross generalizations have characterized analyses of how international changes, whether originating from Europe or the United States, affected Latin America. It was generally presupposed that center-periphery processes followed a uniform pattern in which national cases merely illustrated general international tendencies. However, detailed empirical studies published in the last decades have revealed an immensely complex and diverse panorama, which has exposed the fragility of generalist explanatory models. New Latin American historiography has valued national and local contexts, the role of individual and collective actors, subjectivity, cultural specificities, and multiple temporalities, all of which often questioned or at least relativized traditional periodizations.

This enrichment of historical knowledge has been recently accompanied by urgent calls for integrated syntheses capable of advancing research agendas toward new challenges. In this academic landscape, The Great Depression in Latin America offers a great contribution. Paulo...

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