Médicos intérpretes do Brasil reveals a surprising fact: Brazil has the largest and most organized community of professional historians dedicated to medicine. Evidence can be found in the scope of this book: 640 pages and 27 essays, each written by a different scholar and paired with a historical document. Almost all the contributors are Brazilian, most have doctoral degrees and teach history of medicine at the university level, and at least half have been affiliated with the Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), a giant research institution and graduate program that employs about 20 historians. In comparison, Johns Hopkins and Cambridge, with the two largest history of medicine programs in the North Atlantic, would need to combine their faculties to rival the size of Fiocruz's program. This book also reveals the question that has guided many of these Brazilian researchers: How have their country's...

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