Amber Brian's book—the contents of which are telescoped in the title—documents the social effects of an important archive. The archive in question was the manuscripts belonging to don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl (ca. 1578–1650), who, on his mother's side, was a member of the indigenous ruling family of Texcoco, one of the three city-states that once made up the Aztec Triple Alliance. Alva Ixtlilxochitl's father was Spanish and his mother a mestiza, making his own status ambiguous. However, Alva Ixtlilxochitl strongly identified with his indigenous roots and amassed an important collection of indigenous histories, some of them pictorial, others drawn from oral accounts. This archive was the source for the five histories that he wrote, all of them in Spanish. Upon his death, Alva Ixtlilxochitl's son left the collection to the creole intellectual Carlos Sigüenza y Góngora (1645–1700). Given that Alva Ixtlilxochitl's...

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