Studies of urban indigenous peoples have surged in the last decade, and this book by Dana Velasco Murillo directly engages with this literature. Taking the reader to a borderland that quickly became a major mining city mostly populated by indigenous immigrants, the author uncovers new aspects of urban Indian life within colonial structures. She pulls away from studying the mines, labor, and men to rather illustrate the role of indigenous peoples as settler families and residents of the city: the “indios vecinos.” Velasco Murillo argues that the appropriation and adaptation by indigenous peoples of this vecino (resident) civic identity facilitated the persistence of indigenous societies. The use of colonial buildings and institutions, such as churches and confraternities, enabled the creation of fictive kinship and other networks that led to “a sense of community among the multiethnic indigenous population,” which translated into a...

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