There are a number of ways to encounter the memory of slavery in Brazil. So many traces of slavery's legacy are present in social relationships and ways of thinking—both in practices and in things, whether in institutions, public places, or our everyday workplaces—that they become invisible. The same can be said for the South Atlantic, where the presence of slavery's past, while easily visible, is also completely hidden. Ana Lucia Araujo's edited volume African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World points out exactly this.

A fundamental question that runs through this timely book regards the legitimacy of the various narratives about slavery. After all, who actually wrote the stories of slavery, given that enslaved people and their immediate descendants only very rarely left written accounts about their experiences? Giving voice to enslaved people and their immediate...

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