The reader will find in this book an excellent approach to interethnic family dynamics in a borderland such as Tucson, Arizona, from 1860 to 1930. The author proposes that this place is useful as a case study for researching further this subject because by the end of the nineteenth century its population was predominantly of Mexican background due to scarce economic development that discouraged migration. Therefore, the local primary sources profusely used by Sal Acosta, such as censuses, church and state marriage records, and newspapers, among others, allowed him to reconstruct the marriage relationships between persons of different ethnic backgrounds, which were considered as separate races during that period, giving them a positive or negative connotation.

The combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis of marriage records allows Acosta to elaborate conclusions that question some of the main postulates of the academic historiography...

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