At the turn of the twenty-first century, Dennis Merrill published his pioneering work on tourism and international relations, “Negotiating Cold War Paradise: US Tourism, Economic Planning, and Cultural Modernity in Twentieth-Century Puerto Rico,” in Diplomatic History (2001). A flourish of books on tourism development and international relations, including monographs by Merrill (Negotiating Paradise: US Tourism and Empire in Twentieth-Century Latin America [2009]) and Dina Berger (The Development of Mexico's Tourism Industry: Pyramids by Day, Martinis by Night [2006]) followed in the ensuing decade. Latin American tourism studies then took a postcolonial turn with works including Christine Skwiot's The Purposes of Paradise: US Tourism and Empire in Cuba and Hawai‘i (2010). Jason Ruiz's Americans in the Treasure House contributes further to the intersection of postcolonial cultural discourse and US-Mexican relations during the lengthy dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz (1876–1911).

Utilizing an unusually...

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