Imaginar la nación is in a way a (long) prologue to Incendiar la pradera, tracing the intellectual and ideological sources of what in the latter becomes a reading of revolutionary traditions in Peru. Or as indicated in José Alberto Portugal's opening remarks in Incendiar la pradera, it is meant “to historicize the configuration of subjectivities” through a detailed reading of well-known Peruvian writers and political thinkers: Manuel González Prada, Clorinda Matto de Turner, Enrique López Albújar, Ventura García Calderón, José de la Riva Agüero, Abraham Valdelomar, Luis Valcarcel, José Carlos Mariátegui, and Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre (p. 18). All nine interpret—to a greater or lesser degree—what the Peruvian nation is, how it could or should be changed, what role indigenous peoples play in this process, and the overarching role of colonialism and imperialism in Peru's political, social, economic,...

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