Although the early republican and midcentury reform periods in Mexico have attracted increasing interest in recent years, they continue to be comparatively neglected by the historiography. This is obvious when it comes to the history of Mexico's nineteenth-century conservatives. Condemned by the triumphant liberal historians of the latter half of the nineteenth century for being traitors, they have remained an unpopular subject ever since. While Mexico's nineteenth-century liberals have come to be popularly depicted by Mexican officialdom as the direct predecessors of subsequent generations of progressive politicians, part of a patriotic genealogy of good Mexicans, their conservative enemies have been considered undeserving of serious study. Unlike their liberal antagonists, Mexico's midcentury conservative luminaries remain forgotten. It is remarkable that no major biography has been written of conservative generals such as Tomás Mejía or Miguel Miramón, or that there is no single history...

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