Nowadays, it is hard to avoid the nouvelle vague of transnational history, which often means old-style international history given a fashionable terminological tweak. But some books, including Patrick Iber's Neither Peace nor Freedom: The Cultural Cold War in Latin America, have genuine claims to transnational novelty, by virtue of tracing reciprocal flows of ideas and people—people who are not usually state agents—across porous national boundaries. In this case, Iber analyzes the people and institutions dedicated to waging the cultural Cold War in Latin America: chiefly, those supported by the Soviet Union (in particular, the World Peace Council [WPC]), those bankrolled by the United States (above all, the Congress for Cultural Freedom [CCF]), and those controlled by the Cuban regime after 1959 (the Casa de las Américas, which was far from being a Soviet proxy).

Iber tells a convoluted story, involving some...

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