When scholars of Mexico reflect on the history of Yucatán between the rise of liberalism and the presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas, their thoughts likely turn to henequen or the Caste War; increasingly, however, we must consider the development of medicine as an important part of the historical narrative. The decades between 1870 and 1960 marked a rise and fall of Yucatán as a center of power and wealth, and during this period Yucatecan elites initially drove the Mexican economy from their henequen plantations, and health pioneers there paved the way for important developments in public health. Eventually, Yucatán was absorbed back into the Mexican fold both in terms of its economic importance and its relevance as a center for medical advances. David Sowell's Medicine on the Periphery examines the development of biomedicine in Yucatán throughout this 90-year period. He concludes that the...

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