Robert H. Jackson's study of the Guaraní and Chiquitos missions is part of a revival in the literature about the Jesuits' work in the interior of South America. Jackson's text joins a rich English literature by Barbara Ganson and Julia J. S. Sarreal, whose works highlight culture within the missions and socioeconomic organization to understand their longevity. Jackson's work deviates from these studies in its comparative approach to demographic changes. Jackson's narrative is more comparative than even the bulky title suggests. Rather than simply focusing only on the Jesuit outposts in the Upper Plata and modern Bolivian lowlands, Jackson makes comparisons between those missions and those in the Mexican frontier regions, including Baja California and the modern-day US-Mexican borderlands. His larger conclusion is that the cultural differences between preconquest sedentary populations and nomadic peoples gave rise to different destinies when they entered...

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