In the wake of the National Truth Commission (2012–2014) and the 50th anniversary of the April 1964 coup that ushered in 21 years of authoritarian rule, academic books on Brazil's civilian-military dictatorship have proliferated. Among those published in English, one of the most revealing and timely is Nina Schneider's Brazilian Propaganda. Revealing because Schneider demonstrates that the Brazilian case differs markedly from the Nazi and Soviet experiences with propaganda, thereby challenging long-held assumptions arising from those examples. Timely because the subject matter seems uncannily familiar in the present moment of Brazil's political crisis. The allegation from some quarters that the legally questionable impeachment process amounts to a coup is but one manifestation of the feeling that history is repeating itself. Schneider's findings on dictatorship-era propaganda, including that produced by the commercial media (controlled, then and now, by a tiny elite), offer...

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