In 1492 Antonio de Nebrija published the first print grammar of a European vernacular language. The same year, he released a Latin-Castilian dictionary, and in 1495 he published the inverse, a Castilian-Latin dictionary; the latter and the many editions that followed are the subject of this monograph.

Despite Nebrija's significance, English-speaking historians have written next to nothing about him. The Library of Congress's online catalog revealed no English-language monograph about Nebrija as of April 2016. While linguists and Spanish-speaking scholars have written more, Byron Ellsworth Hamann (Ohio State University) points out that existing work has underappreciated “the constantly changing nature” of Nebrija's Castilian-Latin dictionary (p. 3). In this slender, densely researched monograph, Hamann explores Nebrija's 1495 dictionary and the dozens of vernacular dictionaries that drew upon it over the next century or so, both in Europe and the wider world. Hamann's volume...

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