Erin O'Connor's contribution on motherhood in Latin America focuses on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her work is a successful attempt to historicize motherhood and to show how analysis through the lens of motherhood both complicates our understandings of historical motherhood and elucidates women's social, political, and economic contributions to society. Using motherhood as an analytical category allows us to better understand the themes of reproduction, reproductive work, and reproductive rights because at the heart of these relationships, according to O'Connor, is the reproduction of power. One way that power is reproduced is through stereotypes. In Latin America, many understand gender relations through the stereotypes of machismo and marianismo—that is, the idea that all Latin American men are aggressive and macho and all women are submissive and docile. By historicizing motherhood, O'Connor is able to problematize these ideas by showing how...

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