Conceived at a meeting held in Buenos Aires in 2011, Beyond Imported Magic condenses the major lines of research on science and technology in and about Latin America from the last decades. The title—“imported magic” was a common saying among Brazilian engineers in the 1970s, used to refer to computers—elegantly encapsulates the book's main goal: to demonstrate that the perception of Latin America as a site of passive reception of scientific knowledge from abroad is inaccurate. As the volume's editors assert, this view “overlooks processes of reinvention, adaptation, and use” and reinforces the idea that science and technology were applied “uniformly, rapidly, and unmediated” (p. 2). The 17 essays, along with the foreword by Marcos Cueto, assess the sway of the science and technology studies (STS) field among Latin Americanists.

Besides providing a more accurate alternative to the aforementioned simplistic interpretation of...

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