Edward Murphy provides an engaging, well-researched, and bottom-up historical account of low-income residents in Santiago, Chile, from the 1960s to 2010. Looking at a time of rapid urban growth and dramatic political and economic transformations, the author analyzes the struggles of Santiago's poorest residents and the multiple ways that they have shaped the urban landscape, ideas about property rights, and state housing policies. By examining the intersections between citizenship and home ownership, Murphy reveals how Santiago's housing movement became both a form of urban insurgency and a consolidation of traditional private property rights. From a larger perspective, the book illustrates the history of Chile's urban growth and the ongoing and unresolved questions of urban and social segregation and inequality.

Throughout the book, Murphy shows the critical importance of interdisciplinary research and writing. Weaving together historical and anthropological methodologies and a solid analysis...

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