Yeidy M. Rivero's work is an important contribution to the study of television, modernity, identity, and politics in the second half of the twentieth century in Latin America and the Caribbean. The book addresses a series of efforts to portray Cuba as a developed nation by analyzing distinct technological, legal, commercial, political, and cultural aspects of Cuban television, which was among the earliest developed in the region and a true regional model during the 1950s. The author covers a ten-year period (1950–1960) when Cuban television functioned as a commercial media outlet and, in terms of its commercial structure, was highly influenced by the United States. At the same time, Cuba transitioned from democracy to dictatorship and then revolution, the last of which Rivero covers only the initial years, setting aside what occurred from 1961 onward, when television “was born again” from a...

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