How do national borders define the identities of those that they intersect? How do ecological systems confound borders and identities alike? And perhaps most importantly, how do local indigenous communities defy and even transcend all these boundaries? Shaylih Muehlmann's remarkable book explores these permeable intersections while revealing how the Cucapá—an indigenous community living at the edge of the Colorado River delta in Mexico—have “challenged those lines and configurations. . . . by subverting and reformulating hegemonic discourses about what it means to be Cucapá, what it means to be indigenous, and what it means to be poor in Mexico today” (p. 179). In Where the River Ends, the Cucapá achieve this by engaging in several subversive practices, including defending traditional fishing rights, narcotrafficking, gender-based activism, and alternative linguistic preservation.

As a result of spending more than a year living at a...

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