This book is a welcome addition to scholarship on rural Cuba. It tackles a question that has not been explored in sufficient depth: regional variations in peasant support for the Cuban Revolution and the agrarian reforms of the early 1960s. Although the two regions studied constituted the country's main coffee-producing areas and shared other similarities, they could not have differed more in the aftermath of the revolution. The Sierra Maestra and the Sierra del Cristal in Oriente came to symbolize early on the revolution's promise, while the mountains of Escambray became synonymous with counterrevolution and repression. Joanna Swanger argues that these outcomes were related to differences in race, gender, and class hierarchies and land tenure systems, as well as the way that these factors articulated peasants to the state in the pre- and post-1959 periods.

Swanger shows that peasants in both sites...

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