David Espinosa analyzes Jesuit-led organizations and their relationship to secular politics during the twentieth century, when after the 1910 revolution the Catholic Church and Mexican state clashed dramatically. In the midst of anticlerical revolutionary reforms, the church needed lay organizations to protect its interests, but, as Espinosa demonstrates, church officials subsequently reined in more radical organizations to reestablish its control. When the church sought a more amicable coexistence with the ruling party in the post-1940 period, middle- and upper-class Catholic-educated political activists contributed to Catholic interests. The book begins with French Jesuit Bernardo Bergöend's founding of the Asociación Católica de la Juventud Mexicana (ACJM) in 1913 and ends with the 1979 earthquake that leveled the Universidad Iberoamericana. Organized both chronologically and thematically, Espinosa's study progresses through histories of Catholic organizations, including the ACJM, the Unión Nacional de Estudiantes Católicos (UNEC), the Universidad...

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