John Worth's excellent collection of accounts of sixteenth-century Spanish activity along the lower Gulf Coast of modern Florida and resulting European-indigenous contacts raises the question of why Spanish Florida still remains as marginal to the study of Spanish America and the Caribbean as it does to that of the United States. In recent decades, the history of early postcontact Florida has been well served by a number of scholars, not least of them John Worth. People in the state did their best to use the quincentennial of Juan Ponce de León's 1513 visit to the Florida coast as an occasion to increase general awareness and understanding of the early period of Spanish activity. Yet conferences, books, and other commemorations seem to have done little to bring the significance of Spanish Florida into the mainstream of public or even scholarly awareness outside the...

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