As an organizing principle, space is about as broad a theme as one can employ in historical analysis. It is too broad, in fact, a problem that the editors of this worthwhile collection of essays recognize by gathering the 12 contributions into 4 parts. Fittingly, Juliana Barr and Edward Countryman introduce the rest of the contributions with an excellent examination of how maps represent worldviews and ideals and misrepresent realities. Not surprisingly, they conclude that the very maps that we use in our classrooms represent a European perspective that obscures the indigenous reality of “early” America, by which they mean the Western Hemisphere as it was understood up until the nineteenth-century consolidation of the modern nation-states. In this sense, they are reaching beyond what in US historiographical circles is usually meant by “early America,” which is typically analogous to British North America....

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